Adobe’s Font License– Small Print

It should come as no surprise that I do enjoy good fonts.  For years now I’ve had a subscription to Adobe Creative Cloud, but I also primarily run Linux.  Adobe’s software doesn’t run on Linux.  So, I figured that since I was paying for the Creative Cloud license that I was paying for the ability to use the fonts on my Linux machine.

As it turns out I was kind-of wrong.  I can use the fonts on another machine, but I can’t use them at the same time.  Below is the font EULA with my emphasis in bold.

2.1 General Use. You may install and use one copy of the Software on up to the Permitted Number of your compatible Computers; or

2.2 Server Deployment. You may install one copy of the Software on one Computer file server within your Internal Network for the purpose of downloading and installing the Software on up to the Permitted Number of other Computers within the same Internal Network; or

2.3 Server Use. You may install one copy of the Software on one Computer file server within your Internal Network for the purpose of using the Software through commands, data or instructions (e.g., scripts) from another Computer within the same Internal Network, provided that the total number of users (not the concurrent number of users) that are permitted to use the Software on such Computer file server does not exceed the Permitted Number. No other network use is permitted, including, but not limited to use of the Software, either directly or through commands, data or instructions, from or to a Computer not part of your Internal Network, for Internet or web hosting services or by any user not licensed to use this copy of the Software under a valid licence from Adobe; and

2.4 Portable or Home. The primary user of the Computer on which the Software is installed may install a second copy of the Software for his or her exclusive use on either a portable Computer or a Computer located at his or her home, provided the Software on the portable or home Computer is not used at the same time as the Software on the primary Computer.

 

 

Adobe Caslon Pro

What better way to end the week than with a new font to add to your library?  Fonts are your friends, and on Fridays it’s important to spend time with your friends.

In my book, A Heritage to Follow: Lucius Clark, I had to choose a font, and it was a bit of a toss up.  At the end of the book I explain the decision:

One of the most logical choices of fonts for this book would have been Century Schoolbook since it was designed for educational purposes, released in 1919 (with bold and italic versions released by 1923) precisely during the years Lucius was teaching. But Century Schoolbook takes up more space than what I wanted to use, and I don’t believe it works well at larger sized (chapter titles) or with numbers (0123456789).

So, the font used in this book is Adobe Caslon Pro. It’s become so well known and versatile that in Stephen Coles, The Anatomy of Type he relates the popular mantra, “when in doubt, use Caslon.” While there isn’t much variation in this book, italics and bold faces are used at different points and I believe Caslon has a cleaner expressiveness and consistency through these variations than many other font choices.

Lucius was a man who prided himself on good penmanship, so I wanted him to have a font designed by a master penman, William Caslon. Caslon’s font was first released in 1725. Among my favorite features are the swooping tail of the capital Q and the fact that the capital J extends below text line. While these aren’t very common letters they add character to the text in this book when they do appear. I smile when I see them because I feel they’re playfully doing a magic trick with the rest of the letters watching.

I may not have caught all the typos, but I did select the best type!

Download Adobe Caslon Pro here.  I’ll let your conscience dictate how you pay for it.  If you’re currently paying for a Creative Cloud subscription, you already have.