Corrupting the Language

As the language evolves it evolves in different direction. The Urban Dictionary does a great job showing the evolution of the language, but you can see how crude it is.

In contrast there are these verses in the Book of Moses 6

5 And a book of remembrance was kept, in the which was recorded, in the language of Adam, for it was given unto as many as called upon God to write by the spirit of inspiration;

6 And by them their children were taught to read and write, having a language which was pure and undefiled.

Defile means to make unclean or impure. A language that was pure must be a language that contained only the ability to express things that were pure. After all, this was the language that God used with Adam in the Garden of Eden.

The origin of the root defile includes the from Anglo-French defoiller, defuler meaning to trample. This refers to the process of filling which required stomping on the wool (sometimes soaked in urine) over and over again until the wool was softened enough to make it comfortable. It is not an accident. It is intentional.

We see the word trample elsewhere in the scriptures. In Matthew 7 we hear the Savior prompt

6 Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend you.

The imagery of something as precious as a pearl being trampled is powerful. This use of trample in conjunction with defile shows us that the corrupting of the language is an intentional process taking something that is most beautiful (the language we use to communicate with God) and reducing it only to it’s baser elements crushing what is precious and staining that which is pure.

Guarding our tongues and thoughts will determine how comfortable we are when we meet our Savior again. But as that day is some time off we have lots of time to practice and learn to appreciate the robust versatility and beauty that is our language.

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